From popular fashion magazines to TV talk shows like Oprah, the message is clear that many women are still wearing ill-fitting bras. There are many formulas out there to help you determine your bra size, but the best advice we can give you is to see a bra fitting specialist at your local lingerie shop or major department store. Use your instincts when judging how good they are. While fitters can guide you and recommend a size or style, only you can determine how you feel in the bra. Does it feel comfortable? Do you feel well supported? Do the fit and style make you feel sexy and more confident? Do you like your silhouette? If you hesitate to answer these typical questions, you are more than likely not to wear the bra style or size recommended.

Not all sizes and styles are created equal, so try them on. Over the past few decades, standardized formulas to determine a woman’s bra size have changed. To complicate matters, lingerie designers are now manufacturing and selling their products across the globe. This results in a broader offering to consumers, but has unintentionally created variances in sizing. Try on bras and be open to different brands and styles. You may just find a new favorite to accentuate your silhouette and provide better support.

Face it ladies, our bodies change over time whether we like it or not. Check your size periodically consider it a supportive check-up. It is not uncommon for our breasts to change when we gain or lose weight or to lose their firmness with age. So take the time to visit a bra specialist, especially when you notice a difference in your body.

For some added guidance, here are a few bra fitting tips you can keep in mind when shopping for a new bra.

  • The center front of the bra should rest flat against your body and not pull away from your body.
  • If it pulls away, it may be a sign that the cups are too small.
  • If applicable, the underwire should cup the entire base of the breast like a U.
  • It should not cut into the breast, a sign that the cup size is too small, or overshoot its width, a sign that the cup size is too big.
  • The fabric and padding, if applicable, of the bra cup should gently hold and support the breast.
  • It should not cause your breast to spill over the top (a cup is too small), nor should the fabric pull away from the body (a cup is too big).
  • If you are questioning whether or not it is on the borderline, put your shirt back on and see if you see any telltale signs of it being too tight or too lose.

If it is a good fit, you should see a smooth silhouette of your breasts.

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